Monthly Archives: August 2016

Kaepernick’s ‘Unpatriotic’ Conviction

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“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color…” “To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.”

(http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000691077/article/colin-kaepernick-explains-why-he-sat-during-national-anthem)

As the dog days of the national sports world comes to a close, many networks are looking for virtually anything newsworthy to chew on until college and pro football lines up for the opening snap. That includes socio-political issues that have become immersed in sports talk much to the chagrin to the common man’s sports junkie pleasure. Which brings me to the story of Colin Kaepernick, who, for all intended purposes, might not even keep a roster spot by years end. The story of Kaepernick’s political protest has created…

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Kaepernick’s ‘Unpatriotic’ Conviction

 

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color…” “To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.”

(http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000691077/article/colin-kaepernick-explains-why-he-sat-during-national-anthem)

As the dog days of the national sports world comes to a close, many networks are looking for virtually anything newsworthy to chew on until college and pro football lines up for the opening snap. That includes socio-political issues that have become immersed in sports talk much to the chagrin to the common man’s sports junkie pleasure. Which brings me to the story of Colin Kaepernick, who, for all intended purposes, might not even keep a roster spot by years end. The story of Kaepernick’s political protest has created lighting rod in sports talk because it has more to do with what’s critical and eye opening instead of what’s popular. It transcends the sports world and makes typical Americans focus on a matter that’s often swept under the rug. No, we’re not talking about the usual “black on black crime” that usually circulates the media circuit and puts the emphasis on black folks to get it together. Kaepernick’s statements shines a light on law enforcement which is to the American masses is a slap in the face, followed by an indignant middle finger to everything deemed “white American.” By Kaepernick refusing to stand and acknowledge the national anthem, he has become in many people’s eyes an “anti-American” who is ungrateful for what our military has done—past or present—so he can have the opportunity to enjoy life as a citizen of the alleged free world. How dare Colin commit the sin of patriotic blasphemy, or did he?

None of Kaepernick’s detractors will stick to what he actually said, nor will they point to the reason why he said it. They are quick to point out our service men but will not address our local so-called service men that have gotten away with killing black people with impunity. For instance, you have law enforcement that has been captured on camera murdering African-Americans in cold blood, yet these same officers have as Kaepernick has stated, “getting paid leave for getting away with murder.” So how does such a pivotal statement get misconstrued? Simple because Colin has as Stephen A. Smith articulated, made Americans choose sides; like it or not. If one was to look at social media this past weekend, you can clearly see how the American populous took to Colin’s conviction which was mostly met with venomous ire.

Then you have your Victor Cruz’s and now Jerry Rice’s of the world coming forth trying to diffuse Colin’s stance at the appeasement or out of their own opinion, which coincidentally sides with the prevailing popular opinion—of white folks. I wonder though if these Negro athletes are familiar with the person who wrote the national anthem in the first place? None other than American honored Francis Scott Key, who was a lawyer by day and a slaveholder by all means necessary to benefit the capitalistic so-called patriot. Even if one was to dive in the annals of the Smithsonianmag.com, there lies an article which begs to question “Where’s the Debate on Francis Scott Key’s Slave-Holding Legacy?” Here’s an excerpt for those who just don’t know:

In 1814, Key was a slaveholding lawyer from an old Maryland plantation family, who thanks to a system of human bondage had grown rich and powerful.

When he wrote the poem that would, in 1931, become the national anthem and proclaim our nation “the land of the free,” like Jefferson, Key not only profited from slaves, he harbored racist conceptions of American citizenship and human potential. Africans in America, he said, were: “a distinct and inferior race of people, which all experience proves to be the greatest evil that afflicts a community.” (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/wheres-debate-francis-scott-keys-slave-holding-legacy-180959550/?no-ist)

If one was to read further in the article, you would discover that Key’s racist views were parallel to President Thomas Jefferson and many others; for even he too thought the Negro was a inferior being. With that being said, how can anyone justify their scrutiny towards Kaepernick for not standing for a country whose original sin continues to haunt them at every angle? Whether it be through the media or our government, the fact is the so-called American Negro hasn’t received its well-deserved justice and those who think otherwise are living in a color blind society.  America has made it common practice for the Negro to forget what has happen to his ancestors while having no problem propping up so-called Jews and the travesty of their Holocaust. This is the minimization of black culture which gives rise to the affluent blacks who have quote, “made it” but share the same ideology that is pro bono for white folks.

In the end, what Colin Kaepernick has done is open that same can of worms that too often gets fed to self-righteous journalists, pundits, and typical American skeptics who would rather hear about if Colin will make it to his or hers fantasy league. Given his limited platform, Kaepernick has decided to break the sports code for Negroes by not only refusing to acknowledge the national anthem, but telling you why he does by directly pointing to an institutional problem with law enforcement. I wonder, would Kaepernick’s stance be considered this “newsworthy” if it was something other than black lives? Kaepernick’s stance should leave the normal American downtrodden NOT because you agree or disagree with Colin, but for the simple fact that when you express your beliefs according to our Bill of Rights, you get vilified. The hatred especially gets intensified when you speak on black issues. This is a no-no in America or you’ll get labeled as being a “victim” or some KKK affiliate (for what reason I don’t know) when black folks DO NOT have a history of oppressing folks. But it is what it is…peace and love y’all!

Barkley’s New Show,’The Race Card,’ broaches a Topic He’s All Too Familiar With

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It seems like the folks at TNT wants to give their most charismatic and controversial sports analyst, Charles Barkley, an elevated soapbox far beyond realm of talking NBA basketball. The Hall of Famer, who once considered a career in politics, will finally get the chance to discuss social-political issues now that Turner has green-lighted the provocatively titled series, ‘The Race Card.’ Barkley has always been a purveyor of sharing his own uninhibited truths even at the expense of offending his own [black] community. Moreover, Barkley will be able to disseminate his personal unfiltered rhetoric aided by several “cultural leaders and tastemakers” which will sure to embody what certain people “should do” or “how to behave,” as an underlying tone.

An excerpt from Turner.com’s press release:

 

In The Race Card, Charles Barkley wants to bust up the echo chamber mentality that so often has people retreating to corners of the like-minded, where views are reinforced and ideas are distorted into angry, unexamined groupthink conclusions. Each week, Barkley will take on the rapidly calcifying positions around today’s hot-button topics. He will seek out the sharpest and most varied viewpoints from today’s cultural leaders and tastemakers. He will then challenge and probe those ideas, even trying them out on himself.

 

No idea presented on The Race Card will be left in the abstract. Barkley will put ideas on their feet, with real-world proof-of-concept tests that will engage people and expose the truth behind their closely held beliefs. In the end, Barkley will reach his own conclusions guided only by his own wits and common-sense wisdom.

 

“We as Americans never discuss the issue of race in this country and how it impacts everything in our lives until something bad happens,” Barkley said. “I see this project as a way to talk about race, class and cultural differences and challenge everyone’s status quo.”

 

– See more at: http://www.turner.com/pressroom/tnt-greenlight-series-charles-barkley-orders-pilot-monsters-god-and-renews-last-ship-0#sthash.5VQ1Hsla.dpuf

 

I often wonder the fascination the media has had with “Sir” Charles Barkley for quite some time now. Sure Barkley has an engaging and colorful personality, but he has the media’s “darling” and a go to magnet when discussing social issues—most notably when it comes to race relations. In the past, Barkley has openly discussed the usage of the rousing ‘N-word’ and how he uses the word amongst his black –and white—friends. In an episode of Barkley’s Inside the NBA, Barkley defended his usage of the ‘N-word’ following a tweet sent from [then] L.A. Clipper forward Matt Barnes, after an on-court skirmish involving Serge Ibaka, of the Oklahoma City Thunder. “Matt Barnes, there’s no apology needed,” Barkley lamented about the racial slur used by Barnes on Twitter. “I’m a black man, I use the N-word with my black friends–with my white friends—they are my friends, Barkley said. The “Chuckster” as called by his fellow colleague and Inside the NBA moderator, Ernie Johnson, continued his on camera soliloquy and made mention of what white America shouldn’t dictate:

“This debate goes back to the Paula Dean thing where they’re like ‘Well, black people use it amongst themselves, it’s in rap records.’ Listen, what I do with my black friends is not up to white America to dictate to me what’s appropriate or inappropriate.”

 

This is exactly the kind of frankness and candor many should come to expect from Sir Charles, which has made him a polarizing figure. Unfortunately, some of his remarks hasn’t fared all too well either especially when it has do with African-Americans. Barkley has stated on record that he makes no apologies when it came to what he calls the “dirty dark secret” in black America, during an interview with Anthony Garano in 2014:

“Well unfortunately, as I tell my white friends, we as black people will never going to be successful not because of you white people—but because of other black people. When you’re black, you have to deal with so much crap in your life from other black. It’s a dirty dark secret, I’m glad it’s coming out (…) You black kids, you know, when they do well in school, the loser kids tell em’ ‘Oh, you’re acting white,’ to the kids who speak intelligently. Oh, you’re acting white…”

-Barkley on 914 WIP Philly Radio, 10/23/14

Needless to say, the proverbial “cat was let out of the bag” on black America much to the distaste to some, but to the agreement (yours truly) of others. Barkley also spoke unfavorably about the riots in Ferguson by stating “those aren’t real black people” and he later added more fuel to the fire by calling them “scumbags.” Barkley has since recanted his original sentiments but not before many in the black media and blogosphere labeled him a “sell-out” and an “Uncle Tom.” Even Houston’s own from the legendary rap group, “The Geto Boys,” Willie D, came out of nowhere to address Barkley and others in a song entitled, “Coon.”

Lastly, I don’t think Turner is looking for some “kumbaya” movement with Sir Charles leading the charge. Rather, they’re looking to cash in on what will be considered a “reality-based” program tackling hot button issues. I believe Barkley will definitely have some controversial contemporaries such as the likes of Stephen A. Smith, Dr. Michael Eric Dyson, Roland Martin and a slew of others. This will definitely be an early ratings riser due to the impending anticipation of provocative dialogue surrounding race, politics, and social issues. All in all, let’s hope for lasting viewer sake—and Barkley’s—this show doesn’t end up being ‘Teerible.’  Peace and love y’all!